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Page first featured June 2, 2009

The latest version of their plans as of June 28, 2009, is poorly explained.  Contains no photos or video, no data, no clear schematic, no specific part numbers.  Half the material is about conservation and grid, irrelevant to the plans.  This image is taken, apparently without attribution, from a JLN Labs illustration of the Mini-Romag magnetic generator. You can see the original details at the magnetic energy mirror site. This device can certainly not be obtained for under $100, just machining of the rotor may exceed that to say nothing of sourcing the special magnets. The original plans also specify that it has limited use (there is a more difficult-to-build unit with broader applicability). And those devices (magnetic heating unit, magnetic water pump) which the Mini-Romag is claimed to drive require a special alloy whose production is rather involved.
The latest version of their plans as of June 28, 2009, is poorly explained. Contains no photos or video, no data, no clear schematic, no specific part numbers. Half the material is about conservation and grid, irrelevant to the plans. This image is taken, apparently without attribution, from a JLN Labs illustration of the Mini-Romag magnetic generator. You can see the original details at the magnetic energy mirror site. This device can certainly not be obtained for under $100, just machining of the rotor may exceed that to say nothing of sourcing the special magnets. The original plans also specify that it has limited use (there is a more difficult-to-build unit with broader applicability). And those devices (magnetic heating unit, magnetic water pump) which the Mini-Romag is claimed to drive require a special alloy whose production is rather involved.
The first version of the Magniwork device was based on the Bedini SG circuit, and this photo they showed in their plans is actually a device by Rick Friedrich. [1].
The first version of the Magniwork device was based on the Bedini SG circuit, and this photo they showed in their plans is actually a device by Rick Friedrich. [1].

SCAM: Bogus claim on plagiarized work

AKA (Related Scams)

FreePowerBluePrint.com
Magnets4Energy.com
Magnet4Power.com
Other Affiliate Domains


We've never seen videos, photos, data, or any other evidence that ANYONE has ever actually built a unit that really works. It's pure hype. If you have evidence to the contrary, please let us know.


Magniwork puts for a set of plans for a free energy device they claim could be scaled to power an entire house. However, it turns out that the first device they called for in their plans prior to June 2, 2009 is nothing more than the Bedini SG circuit, featured here at PESWiki and first replicated (according to those plans) by Sterling Allan and later advanced by Rick Friedrich. While interesting science, which some researchers claim to have achieved some measure of overunity; to our knowledge, it has never been embodied in a self-looped system with energy left over for practical use. They then replaced it with information about Hans Coler's technology (not working either).

Most of the 50+ page manual contains energy conservation tips that are based on well-established principles, so the "guarantee" of electricity savings upon following the booklet's tips is safe, but not ethically accurate, inasmuch as the expectation is that the "free energy" device is the reason for the savings on the electrical bill to the utility company.

The video they feature in the opening of their site is of Lutec's technology, who tends to evade credible validation attempts.

We offer the Bedini SG plans for free on this site, where they were originated, with permission from John Bedini.

On June 2, we received an email from the Magniwork webmaster saying "Igor seemed to have messed up this one. I had a chat with him, and we decided we're going to remove any Bedini plans diagrams or instructions. I didn't know that Igor had put copyrighted material in the ebook. If I knew that, I would've never published the product. Igor is going to put the plans for another working free energy machine instead. I don't know exactly which one, you can e-mail him ... if you want to know more about it."

Then later on June 2, we received an email from Igor saying, in part:

"I sent Mr.Bedini email earlier explaining and apologizing myself about my mistake placing the Bedini device as being able to output a power of such proportions. The Bedini motor is currently completely removed from the Magniwork guide."

He said the new Magniwork guide would feature the work of Hans Coler (not yet embodied into a practical, working device), along with some more conventional DIY info for solar panels, wind turbines, solar water heating. He expects that this update will take a month or two to fully complete, but that they will update the manual as subsections are completed.

As of June 28, 2009, the wording on their site still gives the reader the idea that the plans will result in a working free energy device (besides traditional wind and solar); but that is not the case. Such representation is fraud.

One of the "testimonials" on their site by "Curtis Holloway - Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin" is a bogus name. One of the Holloways contacted in Chippewa Falls said she knows all of the Holloways there, and there is not a Curtis. Apparently Magniworks is even making up the testimonials. I have contacted Clickbank regarding this fraud, suggesting that Magniwork should not have an account there. It might help if others complained as well. -- Sterling D. Allan

What's your experience? Take our new poll posted Aug. 16, 2009.

Since posing that poll, we saw that some people were checking the box: "It's powering my house completely." Because we suspected that these statements were fraudulent since no one had produced any evidence of that, we added the phrase "(evidence please)" to that option. Still, as of Oct. 12, 2009, there have been 17 responses to that effect, yet still no evidence has been supplied. Most of those 17 are probably coming from the same person, using different computers or clearing his/her cookies. We've not even seen one photo or video of a completed unit, let alone received data of its operation. No affidavits, and certainly no third party test results. It has all the earmarks of a very successful scam.

Contents

Official Scam Website

Affiliate Sites

Here's a list of some of the affiliate sites. This might come in handy for you if you want to block these ads from appearing in the Google ads on your site. I've reported this to Google and they are investigating (as of Aug. 12, 2009) -- Sterling

amazing.magnetsenergy.com
buyonlineguide.com
discounton.net/Magniwork
discountu.net/Magniwork
electricalenergyfree.com
electricity-generator.net
elitemediatrack.com
energyforpenniesaday.com
ewwebspace.com/mg2/index.html
ewwebspace.com/mg4/index.html
free-energy-generator.com
free-energy-generators.com
free-energy-plans.com
free-power.org
freeelectricity.co.za
freeelectricityenergy.com
freeelectricityfreeenergy.com
freeenergy-freeelectricity.com
freepowerblueprint.com.ar
freepowerblueprint.com
freepowerhome.com
gomagniwork.com
green-renewable-power.com
magnetic.energy.ezgo-now.com - "I have not built one yet"
magnetic-generator.com
magnetichomeenergy.com
magnet-power.com
magnet4power.com
magnet4power.net
magnet55.com
magnetmotor.surfezy.net
magnets-energy.info
magnets4energy.com
magnets4freeenergy.com
magnetsenergy.com
magnetsforenergy.com
magnetgeneratorexposed.com
magneticgenerator.techreviewguy.net
magni-works.com
magniwork-review.com
magniwork-review.net
magniwork.com
magniwork.org
magniwork-pro.com
magniworkenergy.com
magniworkgenerator.com
make-electricity.net
makingyourhomeenergyeasy.com
motormagnet.com
payitforth.com/free-energy/
perpetualmotionmagnet.wordpress.com
power4home.com
squidoo.com/yourfree-energy
sites.google.com/site/freeelectricityproject/
techreviewguy.net
topmagneticgenerator.com
themagneticenergygenerator.com
unlimited-electricity.com
wix.com/youngward/Free-Electricity

Scam

Site Claims

Pre-June 2, 2009 through at least June 28, 2009

"A Zero point magnetic power generator is basically a Free Energy Generator. It uses magnets, and magnetic force to induce ... motion. It runs by itself, indefinitely without stopping, thus creating completely free electrical energy, which can fully power your home for free."

On April 2, 2010, I saw an ad for Magniwork with the following text:

"Featured: Scientist built a home made 24 KW Magnetic Generator for his home A small version is only $100 to Build." [2]

Claims / Rebuttal

Pre-June 2, 2009 through at least June 28, 2009.

The following are some claims made, along with some rebuttals/comments in [brackets]

  • Works in every home. [doesn't work at all as a practical primary energy source]
  • Works in all conditions, can work in extreme hot or cold without any problem [there would be limits to this as magnets degrade in heat].
  • The material needed to build the magniwork generator is cheap and easily accessible anywhere in the world. [v1: true; v2: ?]
  • The steps are easy to follow, even a complete novice would be able to follow them. [v1: true; v2: not at all]
  • It is safe to use and operate. It doesn't produce any harmful byproducts or gases, and there isn't any hazard concerning the generator itself. Even if you have little children, they may freely walk in the close vicinity of the generator. The generator itself isn't flammable or combustible, so it's completely safe.
  • It is also a very eco-friendly solution, it doesn't pollute the environment. [Not entirely true. The rotating component will need to be kept from children, and can injure adults as well. The batteries contain chemicals that are toxic to the environment.]
  • Hundreds of successful magniwork generators have been built around the world. [v1: True. I was the first to replicate this according to the plans we posted from John Bedini at Directory:Bedini SG; and there have been hundreds of replications subsequent to that. However, we don't know of any practical embodiments of the system. -- Sterling D. Allan (May 31, 2009); v2: no known replications]

Lutec Disavows Magniwork

On Nov. 10, 2009, Lutec posted the following notice on their home page in a marquee text:

"BE WARNED - 'MAGNIWORK' IS NOT RELATED IN ANY WAY TO LUTEC AUSTRALIA, DOES NOT SELL PLANS FOR OUR EQUIPMENT AND IS NOT AUTHORISED TO USE OUR VIDEOS ON THEIR SITE!"

The video mentioned is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvB3PiPBozU

Plans

BOGUS CLAIM:

"The magniwork generator DIY guide is on sale today, and all the raw materials needed cost less than $100. The materials needed are very common, and can be easily found at your local hardware store." --magniwork.com

Video Campaign Promotes Non-Magniwork Device

On February 06, 2011 10:47 AM MST, we received the following email notice:

Subject: About the disinfo scam

Hi Sterling.

I didn't know really where to e-mail this, so you got it!

It might be of your interest, that the magniwork people are on it hard. I discovered this week these youtube-accounts, which were created very recently and uploaded 60-90 versions of the same video, just different titles. It's obvious that this is to get many hits. This might be something to mention on the magniwork page in peswiki. Maybe alert youtube, but heck, it's owned by google and the american counsöl of fureign rulaytiöns owns a substatial part of google....

Thanks for paying a bit of attention.

END OF EMAIL

- - - -

I then wrote the following to some associates:

It seems to me that this video is at best a very distant variant of the device described in the Magniwork plans.

The video doesn't show input or output.

I'm guessing it's another device, that wasn't meant to be used as promotional material for Magniwork, but is being used that way anyway, similar to how they used the Sky4News video of the Lutek device.

Comments?

Unscrupulous Behavior

"In all the time I've been running this PESWiki website, I've never seen other instances of specific-page sabotage with the intent of promoting a particular link. But in the case of Magniwork, users have both sabotaged this page (requiring me to put it on "protected" status, disabling general editing), and users have sabotaged other pages, replacing legitimate links to bullet items with links to magniwork product pages. What does this say about this product according to the principle of "by their fruits shall ye know them'?" -- Sterling D. Allan, Nov. 1, 2009

Here are some documented instances of said sabotage:

ACTION: Report Scam Ads

If you agree that Magniwork is a scam and should not be advertising via Clickbank and Google, there is something you can do. Report them. This will take you mabye 2-5 minutes, depending on your skill level with things Internet. You might want to report every time you see one of their ads, when you have a few spare moments.

A message to Magniwork. All we ask is that you provide evidence for your claim. So far neither you nor any of your affiliate nor any of your customers have provided any evidence to support your claim that your plans will result in an inexpensive device capable of powering a home with free energy. If you wish to stop this campaign to shut you out of Clickbank and Google advertising, then just supply some convincing evidence. We would gladly promote your product if it is real. But we do not appreciate you scamming the gullible and sullying the name and reputation of free energy. -- Sterling D. Allan, Nov. 4, 2009

Update: Google and Clickbank No Longer Supporting Magniwork

UPDATE; May 2011. It seems that neither Google nor Clickbank are allowing the Magniwork scam any more. Magniwork is no longer sold through Clickbank; and I've not seen a Magniwork ad show up in Google AdSense for a very long time.

How to report the offending ad to Google

The next time you see one of the many magniwork or affiliate ads on a site, here is all you need to do:

  1. In another browser, go to Google's AdWords Ad Feedback page.
  2. Fill out the complaint form
    • For the field that says, "Please copy and paste the ad's link location", click on "Instructions" and follow the three-step instructions. The url should begin and end something like this: http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/aclk?...&adurl=http://magniwork.com
    • For the field, "what type of feedback do you have", select "I don't trust the advertise to deliver on their claims"
    • For the final "Message" field, you might want to post the url of this page: "See http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Magniwork "
  3. Hit the "Submit" button. You're done.

How to Report this scam campaign to Clickbank

Clickbank is the clearing house for the Magniwork ads. There is one primary account, and many affiliates driving traffic to that account, getting a percentage commission on each sale. To report your discontent with this scam to Clickbank,

  1. Go to http://www.clickbank.com/reportproblem.html
  2. Fill out the form
    • For the "Type of Problem", select "Report DMCA Violation", which has to do with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. That is the most appropriate of their limited options, inasmuch as the Magniwork plans are not their own original material but are taken from the work of others, namely the Mini-Romag magnetic generator [3] [4].
    • In the "Comment" field, feel free to provide a link to the present PESWiki page for supporting material. My comment would be: "Magniwork.com claims to provide plans to build an inexpensive electromagnetic device that will power a house, but they have never provided any evidence that it actually works as claimed. At least one of their testimonials is a fabricated name, as no such person lives in the town listed. The plans are not of their own origin, but a copies of the work of others, without attribution. The work they plagiarize claims the device to be capable of producing 24 Watts -- hardly enough to power a house. Probably one of the reasons more people don't request a refund is that 1) the plans give the appearance of describing how to build a generator, but are intimidating to people as they are not simple and require many expensive components; 2) people are in denial and don't want to admit that they have been defrauded; 3) the terms of the 60-day money-back guarantee are that the customer will reduce their energy bill, and because the guide includes generally-available, well-proven methods of reducing energy consumption, that is a safe guarantee to make, sidestepping the core claim of the book that their plans will result in a working generator capable of powering a house. For supporting information, see http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Magniwork " -- Sterling D. Allan, Nov. 5, 2009.
  3. Click the "Submit" button; you're done.

Poll

  • Featured / Polls: Electromagnetic > Magniwork >
    Poll regarding the Magniwork power generator - We've been calling it a scam, but is it? What's your experience? Haven't bought the plans. • Won't get plans; a scam. • Got the plans; looks bogus. • Got the plans; haven't tried building. • Plans not clear enough. • Built it; doesn't tap free energy. • It's powering stuff, but not house. • It's powering my house completely. (PES Network; Aug. 16, 2009)

What's your experience? Take our new poll posted Aug. 16, 2009.

Since posing that poll, we saw that some people were checking the box: "It's powering my house completely." Because we suspected that these statements were fraudulent since no one had produced any evidence of that, we added the phrase "(evidence please)" to that option. Still, as of Oct. 12, 2009, there have been 17 responses to that effect, yet still no evidence has been supplied. Most of those 17 are probably coming from the same person, using different computers or clearing his/her cookies. We've not even seen one photo or video of a completed unit, let alone received data of its operation. No affidavits, and certainly no third party test results. It has all the earmarks of a very successful scam.

Infirmed Sites that Still Advertise

The following is a listing of websites that run ads for the Magniwork system, notwithstanding being given several notices that Magniwork is a scam. They apparently care more about the revenue the ads generate, than in being truthful to their web audience that they are being fleeced. Please contact the site owners to encourage them to stop running these ads. It creates a 'boy who cried wolf' type of syndrome; so that when something real finally does come along, people will not pay attention because of the scams that have made them dulled to the claims.

  • http://MoneyTeachers.com - Paul Drockton has been given several notices by email over several months, and has not removed the Magniwork ad that shows up at the bottom of the stories he posts.

Coverage

In the News

  • Buyer Beware > Electromagnetic > Magniwork >
    Lutec Disavows Magniwork - Lutec posted the following notice on their home page in a marquee text: [all caps] "Be Warned - 'Magniwork' is not related in any way to Lutec Australia, does not sell plans for our equipment and is not authorized to use our videos on their site!" (PESWiki; Nov. 10, 2009)
  • Featured: Buyer Beware > Electromagnetic > Magniwork >
    ACTION: Report Magniwork (Scam) Ads to Google and Clickbank - Easy steps presented for you to be able to lodge a complaint about the fraudsters who are selling plans for what alleges to be an inexpensive electromagnetic free energy machine capable of powering a house, though no supporting evidence has been given. Let's stop these hucksters who prey on the free energy believers and give the field a bad name. (PESWiki; Nov. 5, 2009)
  • Buyer Beware >
    Magniwork Energy internet scam - Internet fraudsters are raking in thousands of dollars a day with a scam selling plans for what alleges to be an electromagnetic free energy machine capable of powering a house. One estimate puts sales of the guide as high as 5,000 copies a month, making the scam worth up to $3m a year. (Off-Grid; Oct. 8, 2009) [We've not yet received a scrap of evidence supporting the claims.]
  • Featured: Electromagnetic > Bedini SG >
    Magniwork free energy plans = bogus claim; say they'll remedy that - Magniwork has been selling a set of plans for a free energy device they say could be scaled to power an entire house. However, it turns out that the device is nothing more than the Bedini SG circuit, which, though interesting, has never been embodied in a self-looped system with energy left over for practical use. They've apologized and removed the Bedini stuff. (PESWiki; June 2, 2009)

Feedback

See also Discussion page

Useless Plans

On Feb. 10, 2010, Jerry Decker wrote in response to the question: "Is magniwork generator a scam or not?":

"absolutely useless 'plans', do a search on the net and you can bet the positive reviews are from people who are selling that crap to get the 75% associate fee. would love to see a class action suit against them all for fraud. plans were stolen from Bedini and Naudin, I had posted where you could download the originals for free but don't remember what the link was. save your money, there are better things to do with it than give it to any of those crooks. can't understand why google allows them to advertise with them."

Vapor Witness

On Aug. 29, 2009, Will Goodlett wrote:

I read on their fraud sheet that a Alex Kirkham in Hereford Texas has made on of these things.

Hereford is nearby so I have found out the following...

  • He owns no property in that county
  • He has no telephone in Hereford (land line or cell)
  • I have also asked a number of people that have lived there for many years and no one has ever heard of him...

So...Beware.

Plans Avilable for Free Elsewhere

On Aug. 18, 2009, Rory wrote:

Don't waste your money - all the plans in the book are copied from these two pages, where you can get them for free:

They have also changed some of original information, I suspect they have done this intentionaly to make it look easier to build it - finding an alloy with that exact composition may not be easy:

Magniwork Book:
Q: What kind of material should be used for the brass rotor? A: You can use copper, zinc, tin, or lead, we recommend using copper.

Original instructions:
Q1) What type of brass is used for the rotor?
A1) brass rotor made of 83% copper, 3% Zinc, 7% Tin and 7% Lead.

I don't know if this device works, but I'll bet they haven't even tried to build it themselves, or know anyone who has. Otherwise it would be obvious to have a video on their sites showing it working, instead of showing videos of other devices which has nothing to do with the Romag device at all.

The whole thing seem to be a very well thought out scam. They do however promise af full refund no questions asked, and I got my money back though I had to go to Clickbank to get them since they didn't respond to my email.

Fraudulent Company Should Not Have Clickbank Account

On June 30, 2009, Sterling D. Allan wrote:

I submitted the following at http://www.clickbank.com/reportproblem.html

I would like to report on a fraudulent product being promoted by vendor: Magniwork. See http://Magniwork.com

I have been in close communication with this company trying to bring them into honesty, but at this point have lost patience with them and feel that the community at large needs to be protected from their fraudulent representations.

I think they should lose their clickbank account.

I expose them as a "fraud" at http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Magniwork

First, they take plans for electromagnetic systems of interest then exaggerate the capabilities of these devices way beyond the truth.

Second, when they first came along at the first of the month, they were promoting plans and images which turn out to belong to John Bedini and Rick Friedrich. They were using these without permission. When I brought this to their attention, they then found another set of plans of a departed person and integrated these into their ebook. However, the later ones, like the first, do not result in a generator capable of powering anything, let alone a home, as their splash page suggests.

I am a free energy advocate, as you will see from our news at http://FreeEnergyNews.com, but I get frustrated with those who fraudulently promote technologies that do not work as claimed, and they know it.

Today I learned that at least two of the "testimonials" on their plash page are total fabrications. The people to whom they attribute these testimonials do not exist. In an attempt to track down the testimonials, this person called someone in the town&state with the last name given. That lady said that she knows all the people by that last name in that area, and there is no one by the name given.

Their advertising through Google AdSense is likewise fraudulent, making claims that are deceptive and totally incorrect.

Please shut down the magniwork account.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about this.

Just a Bedini Circuit

On May 31, 2009, Sterling D. Allan wrote:

It's definitely a Bedini's circuit, and is stated as such, as we have posted in our open source page at http://peswiki.com/energy/Directory:Bedini_SG

I would be very surprised if it actually results in a net energy gain. I never saw that in all the testing I did a few years back.

Rick Friedrick seems to believe that a net energy gain can be achieved using this system, but I've not yet seen (or understood?) the data that supports that claim. I don't know of anyone who has built a self-looped system that is practical.

Here's the crux of the system, quoting from the Magniwork plans:

"Once the batteries are supercharged, place four batteries on the back end (charging), with one on the front end running the circuit. Once that battery has gone down to its 20% from full level, rotate one of the four batteries on the back end into the front. The sequence of rotation should be one of taking turns so that the one on the back side that has been there the longest goes to the front side. You can repeat this procedure for six months without ever having to externally charge the system. Bear in mind that your success in achieving this may be determined first by finding the optimal window of performance for your particular set-up."

Whenever I rotated the batteries through the system, there was a net energy loss in the system.

Yes, there have been hundreds of replications of this system, but I don't know anyone who is using even one system to provide a continuous net energy gain from one of them.

At best, these plans are being promoted by someone who is a sloppy optimist and hasn't done his homework.

A question I would like to ask the person selling these plans is: "Are you running your home 100% using this technology?" I bet the answer is, "not yet." I would even bet that he's not running anything with it.

Their recommendation of discharging the battery to 20% before switching it will quickly destroy most batteries, which shouldn't be discharged below 80%.

'Glad I Saw Your Page Before Buying

On July 04, 2009, M.M. wrote:

I just want to thank you for the article on the MagniWork self perpetuating generator. I had considered buying their plans, but decided to look into it a little myself. Over several days of searching the net I could not find anyone who actually built this thing, and used it to power anything. Still I was compelled to buy [their] plans, because I could not find any negative reviews on it either. Then I ran across your article, and you confirmed what I suspected (you know that nagging at the back of your mind), that it was just a scam. Thanks again for your article and research.

Not Credible

On August 16, 2009, Peter Lindemann wrote:

As for the Magniwork thing, B.P. sent me a copy of the booklet for my review. I told him the current version looks like a standard homemade generator, that probably has no special behaviors. [...] I think the claims, that an average person, without a machine shop and the skills to go with it, can build a generator based on the plans included in this manual, are not credible. I guess that makes it a scam. Having prototyped dozens of experimental motors and generators in the last 30 years, I seriously doubt if any of the testimonials on their "sell page" are genuine.

Related Links

  • Free Energy Generator: The Mini Romag Electromagnetic Motor - The Mini Romag free energy generator from Magnetic Energy uses the principle of moving magnetic flow named “the magnetic current” for generating electrical power. According to Magnetic Energy this generator is able to produce 3.5 volts, 7A DC ( about 24 Watts ) of free electricity while its generate sufficient power to sustain itself… (The Green Optimistic; Feb 6, 2008)

Contact

The company does not want their contact info listed here. You'll have to get it from their scam site.

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